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Parking Lot Restriping for ADA Compliance

Making sure your parking lot is ADA compliant is a project that many property owners/managers seem to put off until absolutely necessary. The task may seem challenging at first, but it is something that eventually will have to be done and done correctly. Restriping parking lots to meet ADA Standards for Accessible Design requirements is the responsibility of all businesses, State or local government agencies, or other covered entities. Failure to do so would violate the ADA, and that is definitely not worth the risk, especially since restriping is relatively inexpensive.

So how do you restripe your parking lot need so that it is ADA compliant? The ADA Business Brief is a helpful guide and provides key information about how to create accessible car and van spaces, as well as how many spaces to provide when parking lots are restriped. Below are the items that are outlined in the brief:

 

Accessible Parking Spaces for Cars

Accessible parking spaces for cars have at least a 60-inch-wide access aisle located adjacent to the designated parking space. The access aisle is just
wide enough to permit a person using a wheelchair to enter or exit the car. These parking spaces are identified with a sign and located on level ground.

 

Van-Accessible Parking Spaces

Van-accessible parking spaces are the same as accessible parking spaces for cars except for three features needed for vans:

 

One of eight accessible parking spaces, but always at least one, must be van-accessible.

(illustration showing a van with a side-mounted wheelchair lift
lowered onto a marked access aisle at a van-accessible parking space.
A person using a wheelchair is getting out of the van.
A dashed line shows the route from the lift to the sidewalk.)

Minimum Number of Accessible Parking Spaces

ADA Standards for Accessible Design 4.1.2(5)

Total Number of Parking Spaces Provided (per lot)

(Column A)
Total Minimum Number of Accessible Parking Spaces (60″ & 96″ aisles)

Van-Accessible Parking Spaces with min. 96″ wide access aisle

Accessible Parking Spaces with min. 60″ wide access aisle

1 to 25

1

1

0

26 to 50

2

1

1

51 to 75

3

1

2

76 to 100

4

1

3

101 to 150

5

1

4

151 to 200

6

1

5

201 to 300

7

1

6

301 to 400

8

1

7

401 to 500

9

2

7

501 to 1000

2% of total parking providedin each lot

1/8 of Column A*

7/8 of Column A**

1001 and over

20 plus 1 for each 100 over 1000

1/8 of Column A*

7/8 of Column A**

one out of every 8 accessible spaces ** 7 out of every 8 accessible parking spaces

Features of Accessible Parking Spaces for Cars

ADABlog2

 

(plan drawing showing an accessible parking space for cars
with a 96 inch wide designated parking space,
a 60 inch wide min. marked access aisle and the following notes)

Sign with the international symbol of accessibility mounted high enough so it can be seen while a vehicle is parked in the space.

 

Three Additional Features for Van-Accessible Parking Spaces

 

(plan drawing showing a van-accessible parking space
with a 96 inch wide designated parking space, a 96 inch wide min.
marked access aisle and the following notes)

 

Location

Accessible parking spaces must be located on the shortest accessible route of travel to an accessible facility entrance. Where buildings have multiple accessible entrances with adjacent parking, the accessible parking spaces must be dispersed and located closest to the accessible entrances.

When accessible parking spaces are added in an existing parking lot, locate the spaces on the most level ground close to the accessible entrance. An accessible route must always be provided from the accessible parking to the accessible entrance. An accessible route never has curbs or stairs, must be at least 3- feet wide, and has a firm, stable, slip-resistant surface. The slope along the accessible route should not be greater than 1:12 in the direction of travel.

Accessible parking spaces may be clustered in one or more lots if equivalent or greater accessibility is provided in terms of distance from the accessible entrance, parking fees, and convenience. Van-accessible parking spaces located in parking garages may be clustered on one floor (to accommodate the 98-inch minimum vertical height requirement).

 

Free Technical Assistance

Answers to technical and general questions about restriping parking lots or other ADA requirements are available by telephone on weekdays. You may also order the ADA Standards for Accessible Design and other ADA publications, including regulations for private businesses or State and local governments, at any time day or night. Information about ADA-related IRS tax credits and deductions is also available from the ADA Information Line.

Department of Justice

ADA Information Line

800-514-0301 (voice)

800-514-0383 (TTY)

 

ADA Website and ADA Business Connection

You may also review or download information on the Department’s ADA Internet site at any time. The site provides access to the ADA Business Connection and the ADA design standards, ADA regulations, ADA Policy Letters, technical assistance materials, and general ADA information. It also provides links to other Federal agencies, and updates on new ADA requirements and enforcement efforts.

 

Ready for Restriping?

Pavement Corporation would be happy to come out and assess your parking lot for ADA Compliance. Contact us today at 855.976.8465 x1008 or info@pavementcorp.com to schedule an appointment.

 


Handicap Parking Repair

Those involved in planning parking patterns for businesses and buildings across the country have a strong incentive to be familiar with the federal guidelines for handicapped parking spaces. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was most recently updated in 2010, and it includes the complete list of federal guidelines for handicapped parking compliance in the United States.

Number of Spaces
The number of handicapped parking spaces required for a business depends on the size of the parking lot. Up to the first 100 spaces, only one spot in 25 is required to be handicap-accessible. One spot in 50 is needed for the next 100 spaces, and one spot in 100 for any additional 100 up to 500 spaces. If a lot contains between 500 and 1,000 spaces, 2% of the spaces must be handicap-accessible. If a lot exceeds 1,000 spaces, 20 accessible spaces are required, plus an extra accessible space for each additional 100 spaces.

Certain facilities are required to have more accessibility depending on their function. Hospitals and outpatient centers, for example, must have 10% of their spaces meet modern accessibility guidelines. Physical therapy and rehabilitation clinics must have 20%.

Parking Space Locations
Per the ADA regulations, handicap-accessible spaces must be located on the shortest accessible route to the entrance of the building or site that the parking lot services. For general-use parking lots, handicap-accessible spaces should be located close to a public walkway, such as a sidewalk, with an accessible means of reaching it.

Parking Space Specifications
Handicap-accessible spaces have explicit guidelines on how they are to be sized and proportioned. Spaces with car accessibility must be a minimum of 96 inches wide, while spaces intended for use with vans must be a minimum of 132 inches wide. Both types of spaces must have an access aisle adjacent to them.

Access aisles connect accessible parking spaces to entrances. These aisles must be at least 60 inches wide, but they can be shared by adjacent accessible spaces. Access aisles must extend the entire length of the accessible space it services, and they should be clearly marked to discourage parking within their boundaries. Both access aisles and the spaces adjacent to them must have 98 inches of vertical clearance.

Accessible spaces should not generally be placed on a sloped surface – there is a strong preference for building accessible spaces and aisles on flat ground to better serve the needs of their users. Building accessible parking on grades is only permitted if the grade is very shallow (1:48 or lower).

Accessible parking spaces must also be adequately labeled to signify their use. Spaces must be labeled with the International Symbol of Accessibility – the well-known pictograph of the figure sitting in a wheelchair in front of a blue background. For a space to be in compliance with accessibility guidelines, a sign with the accessibility symbol must be placed at least 60 inches from the ground to mark the space in question. If the space is to be designed to be van accessible, a sign should be added beneath the first to reflect this as well.